nessatumbles
emergentfutures:

The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Killed Reading Books, Show Them This Chart


“Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. Well, that time never existed. Check out these stats from Gallup surveys. In 1957, not even a quarter of Americans were reading a book or novel. By 2005, that number had shot up to 47 percent. I couldn’t find a more recent number, but I think it’s fair to say that reading probably hasn’t declined to the horrific levels of the 1950s.”

Full Story: Atlantic

emergentfutures:

The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Killed Reading Books, Show Them This Chart

“Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. 

Well, that time never existed. Check out these stats from Gallup surveys. In 1957, not even a quarter of Americans were reading a book or novel. By 2005, that number had shot up to 47 percent. I couldn’t find a more recent number, but I think it’s fair to say that reading probably hasn’t declined to the horrific levels of the 1950s.”


Full Story: Atlantic

8bitfuture:

$10 million project aims to create ‘printable robots’.

An MIT project aiming to reinvent how robots are designed has received a $10 million grant from the US National Science Foundation.

“This research envisions a whole new way of thinking about the design and manufacturing of robots, and could have a profound impact on society,” MIT professor Daniela Rus, leader of the project, said in a statement, adding that the project could help to “democratize access to robots.”

The team has already built several prototypes as shown in the video, including a robotic ‘insect’, a robotic fish, and a gripper to pick them up.

simplifyyourlife:

SIMPLIFY YOUR PHONE LIFE
Now, through our smartphones, we have access to almost any information, anytime, anywhere. But being connected 24/7 can be both a blessing and a curse. So, what should we do? Chen shares the following:

In a connected society, we can evaluate how to use our gadgets in a healthy and constructive way as well as how to combat behaviors that are affecting our health and our relationships.

While there were times that I also felt like throwing my phone into the ocean, I know we can gain control by setting limits. Here’s an example: 

Set apart a room in their homes where technology is completely forbidden so they can rest or interact with each other without digital distraction. “No cell phones in this room” would be the new equivalent of “Please take of your shoes before entering.”

Our phones are just tools. It should help us live better lives. If our gadget is complicating or adding stress to our life (ex: by being connected to social networks or work all the time), then we should start redefining our use of it.
How about you? Do you have any good practices when it comes to using your phone? Feel free to share. Thanks! -Danny

simplifyyourlife:

SIMPLIFY YOUR PHONE LIFE

Now, through our smartphones, we have access to almost any information, anytime, anywhere. But being connected 24/7 can be both a blessing and a curse. So, what should we do? Chen shares the following:

In a connected society, we can evaluate how to use our gadgets in a healthy and constructive way as well as how to combat behaviors that are affecting our health and our relationships.

While there were times that I also felt like throwing my phone into the ocean, I know we can gain control by setting limits. Here’s an example: 

Set apart a room in their homes where technology is completely forbidden so they can rest or interact with each other without digital distraction. “No cell phones in this room” would be the new equivalent of “Please take of your shoes before entering.”

Our phones are just tools. It should help us live better lives. If our gadget is complicating or adding stress to our life (ex: by being connected to social networks or work all the time), then we should start redefining our use of it.

How about you? Do you have any good practices when it comes to using your phone? Feel free to share. Thanks! -Danny